How devilishly good is “Lucifer?” Season 1 Review!!

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Joan Osborne asked years ago what if God was one of us. Well, what if the Devil left Hell and went to Los Angeles? That’s the premise behind FOX’s new series “Lucifer.” Based on the Vertigo Imprint comic series, Lucifer follows the adventures of a bored Lord of Hell who decides to take a leave of absence and venture to the human world for the beauty of Los Angeles, where he gets his kicks helping the LAPD punish criminals”. Lucifer runs a piano bar in Los Angeles called “Lux”, with the assistance of his demonic ally Mazikeen. After a minor celebrity whom Lucifer once helped achieve fame is murdered outside his club, Lucifer becomes involved with the LAPD when he takes it upon himself to assist Detective Chloe Decker in finding the one responsible so that he can “punish them”.

In episode 7, "Wingman", Amenadiel, Lucifer and Chloe Decker attend an auction to bid for Lucifer's wings

In episode 7, “Wingman”, Amenadiel, Lucifer and Chloe Decker attend an auction to bid for Lucifer’s wings

Lucifer is an enjoyable series with plenty of humor amidst the show’s crime drama aspect. Tom Ellis is devilishly delightful as Lucifer. He portrays the Fallen Angel with intoxicating charm and alluring dark humor who is very self-assured and confident in his status. Like the comics, Lucifer is not truly evil despite how he has been perceived by humans throughout the centuries. The series shows him in a brighter light, making him more the “victim of persecution” rather than the Prince of Darkness. During his visit on Earth, he becomes infatuated with LAPD detective Chloe Decker who seems immune to his abilities of persuasion. Lucifer’s witty charm and carefree attitude plays off of Chloe Decker’s straight laced, no nonsense professionalism very well, making for plenty awkward moments for Decker which just simply entertains Lucifer. It is enjoyable to watch Decker fluster whenever Lucifer does something out of the ordinary such as nonchalantly entering the home of a suspect, consistently flirting with every female he encounters or stripping naked in a store and handing his clothes to a homeless man. Clearly, this isn’t your typical “fire and brimstone” depiction of El Diablo. Lucifer is portrayed in a manner that makes him likeable and feel for him at times. Though he holds no bars on punishing the wicked, Lucifer does show restrain for innocent souls and even will befriend those that he finds distasteful at first, including those that follow his father. The devil may even cry when an innocent life is unnecessarily taken. There are moments that make you feel empathy for Lucifer due to his status in the eyes of his former fellow angels and how he is perceived by humans. As the season progressed, we get more insight into Lucifer himself via his sessions with his psychiatrist Linda Martin, who believes his identity is just a persona Lucifer made up. (Yup, he’s pulling a Tony Soprano.) Eventually, Lucifer soon grows on Chloe Decker and she begins to warm up to him. Though she still has a time dealing with his “Lucifer-ness.”

Lucifer befriends a piano playing priest (played by Colman Domingo, who played on Nash Bridges and Law and Order) in the episode "A Priest walks into a bar."

Lucifer befriends a piano playing priest (played by Colman Domingo, who played on Nash Bridges and Law and Order) in the episode “A Priest walks into a bar.”

Overall, Lucifer is a sheer delight of a crime drama/comedy oozing with sexuality and dark humor with great dialogue and flawless delivery that make it enjoyable to watch. The cast is fun and entertaining, and show great chemistry. This first season was to give those who are unfamiliar with Lucifer or the Sandman comics an introduction to the Ruler of Hell. Perhaps we’ll see more of the supernatural aspect as well as meet other characters such as Sandman, Etrigan or (fingers crossed) Constantine from the comic book series.